Running IE? Then you’re to blame for your own problems

Corporate web servers are infecting visitors’ PCs

There are very few good reasons to use IE these days. You get mondo spyware invasion, and Firefox just release 0.9, which is fast, free, and fab.

This has nothing to do with any kind of /. “Micro$oft is evil and only free open source stuff rules!” action. IE is junk that is bloated and dangerous to run. And it seems like everyone I talk to who has problems with their Windows PC is crammed to the gills with spyware that came to them via the wonder of IE.

(Or the wonder of Kazaa…but again, said spyware generally installs itself INTO IE)

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~ by Matt Stratton on June 25, 2004.

7 Responses to “Running IE? Then you’re to blame for your own problems”

  1. I really disliked Mozilla but I got Firefox as per your recommendation and have to admit that I really dig it.

  2. I really disliked Mozilla but I got Firefox as per your recommendation and have to admit that I really dig it.

  3. NOT using IE is all fine and dandy for personal use, but if you are running a microsoft backend and secure all your apps with Active Directory (NT Challenge Response) the pass through authentication isn’t supported in other browsers.

    So unless you want to prompt your network users every time they access every app on your network, then you need IE.

    It’s not always a clear choice for people to make. The problem real problem is the lack of development on IE by Microsoft. I read they are going to restart IE development again, so maybe that will lead to a more advanced browser.

    The natural counter-point is “USE AN OPEN AUTHENTICATION STANDARD” but that is moot because you don’t need to if you are a end-to-end microsoft shop. Contrary to popular belief, there are huge architecture advantages and project efficiency advantages in doing so.

  4. I just downloaded it and I love it so far! Issue is, some of the crap I use requires IE (that sucks).

  5. I love Firefox especially with cool extensions. But, IE is still a necessity for parts of web life. I suggest Green Browser (http://www.morequick.com/indexen.htm) as a nice add on for that – adds tabs and mouse gestures for quick shortcuts.

  6. Clearly (based upon my profession), I’m not a no-holds-barred Microsoft basher. Yes, I know I drink a lot of Steve Jobs’s Kool-Aid, but that’s not what this is about.

    I still have to run IE – especially in work environments, when corporate intranet apps (like you discussed) don’t work with anything else. But then again, an internal, corporate intranet server isn’t likely to be one hit with the vulnerabilities I mentioned. At least one would hope not.

    Also, in an environment such as the one you described, the assumption is that the workstations are properly secured, which is going to take care of a good portion of the spyware action. I am a firm believer in the locked-down workstation action when it comes to a corporate PC – my thought is, if you want to be an admin on your box, you officially void all expectations of support. If you want your computer to be supported, you should be willing to allow it to be managed. You want to be able to install WeatherBug and KoolWidget 2.0, then you roll the dice and take your chances, but don’t call the help desk when something breaks.

    …end-to-end microsoft shop. Contrary to popular belief, there are huge architecture advantages and project efficiency advantages in doing so.

    I don’t disagree one bit. The most rock-solid environment I ever supported was at Heller, which was 100% Microsoft. Now, it also helped that it was properly designed and architected (I’ve been in all MS shops that were huge messes as well), but a homogenous environment is always going to be easier to deal with than a heterogenous one.

  7. Clearly (based upon my profession), I’m not a no-holds-barred Microsoft basher. Yes, I know I drink a lot of Steve Jobs’s Kool-Aid, but that’s not what this is about.

    I still have to run IE – especially in work environments, when corporate intranet apps (like you discussed) don’t work with anything else. But then again, an internal, corporate intranet server isn’t likely to be one hit with the vulnerabilities I mentioned. At least one would hope not.

    Also, in an environment such as the one you described, the assumption is that the workstations are properly secured, which is going to take care of a good portion of the spyware action. I am a firm believer in the locked-down workstation action when it comes to a corporate PC – my thought is, if you want to be an admin on your box, you officially void all expectations of support. If you want your computer to be supported, you should be willing to allow it to be managed. You want to be able to install WeatherBug and KoolWidget 2.0, then you roll the dice and take your chances, but don’t call the help desk when something breaks.

    …end-to-end microsoft shop. Contrary to popular belief, there are huge architecture advantages and project efficiency advantages in doing so.

    I don’t disagree one bit. The most rock-solid environment I ever supported was at Heller, which was 100% Microsoft. Now, it also helped that it was properly designed and architected (I’ve been in all MS shops that were huge messes as well), but a homogenous environment is always going to be easier to deal with than a heterogenous one.

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