Olbermann again

“Your words are lies, Sir. They are lies, that imperil us all.”

We have handed a blank check drawn against our freedom to a man who may now, if he so decides, declare not merely any non-American citizens “Unlawful Enemy Combatants” and ship them somewhere – anywhere – but may now, if he so decides, declare you an “Unlawful Enemy Combatant” and ship you somewhere – anywhere.

And if you think this hyperbole or hysteria… ask the newspaper editors when John Adams was President, or the pacifists when Woodrow Wilson was President, or the Japanese at Manzanar when Franklin Roosevelt was President.

And if you somehow think Habeas Corpus has not been suspended for American citizens but only for everybody else, ask yourself this: if you are pulled off the street tomorrow, and they call you an alien or an undocumented immigrant or an “unlawful enemy combatant” — exactly how are you going to convince them to give you a court hearing to prove you are not? Do you think this Attorney General is going to help you?

This President now has his blank check. He lied to get it. He lied as he received it. Is there any reason to even hope, he has not lied about how he intends to use it, nor who he intends to use it against?

I fully realize that this country is not divided along truely black and white lines. I realize that not all Conservatives/Republicans think that everything the current administration is doing is good. But I wonder – those of you who voted for GWB in this past election – do you feel good about this? Are you happy with what has happened? Or do you not mind that the suspension of Habeas Corpus and erosion of human rights as long as financial and econmic issues that affect you are served?

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~ by Matt Stratton on October 19, 2006.

3 Responses to “Olbermann again”

  1. 1. Understand that a vote for GWB in 2004 does not equal the endorsement of tresspassing on civil liberties.

    2. Understand that supporting action in Iraq does not mean being happy with the way things are going and the current policies on the table.

    3. Realize that saying, “I knew this would happen all along and that is why I didn’t vote for Bush” is confirmation bias. Anyone can play what-if-history.

    It is my opinion that GWB’s execution has been really bad this term… His policies are NOT succeeding. So for me, if Bush ran for President today, I wouldn’t vote for him.

    Do I regret my vote? No… that isn’t the point. If you think it is than re-read items 1-3 above.

  2. Understood. And this was not supposed to be a “look at what happened because you didn’t vote the same way as I did”. I am honestly curious as to the responses, such as yours. Thank you for dignifying my post with a response πŸ™‚

  3. I mostly agree with tjmweb.

    The big thing for me is that I had absolutely no confidence in Kerry. I would love to have seen a viable libertarian third party (yeah, probably never going to happen).

    I am absolutely against the erosion of civil liberties, and the amassing of power by the executive branch. I hate that bigger government, pandering to special interest groups, and more frivolous spending is not viewed with as much distaste by Republicans as it once was.

    At the same time, I believe that Bush isn’t as unintelligent as people would like to think him. I also consider him to be a man of principles in that he believes that what he is doing is right. So, even if I disagree with him, I can often understand where he is coming from, and what I can expect from him. In my mind, being a known quantity instead of constantly being wishy-washy on everything can be more important than the specific policies being enforced. ‘The devil you know,’ and all that. My conservative christian upbringing probably helps a lot, too. πŸ™‚

  4. I mostly agree with tjmweb.

    The big thing for me is that I had absolutely no confidence in Kerry. I would love to have seen a viable libertarian third party (yeah, probably never going to happen).

    I am absolutely against the erosion of civil liberties, and the amassing of power by the executive branch. I hate that bigger government, pandering to special interest groups, and more frivolous spending is not viewed with as much distaste by Republicans as it once was.

    At the same time, I believe that Bush isn’t as unintelligent as people would like to think him. I also consider him to be a man of principles in that he believes that what he is doing is right. So, even if I disagree with him, I can often understand where he is coming from, and what I can expect from him. In my mind, being a known quantity instead of constantly being wishy-washy on everything can be more important than the specific policies being enforced. ‘The devil you know,’ and all that. My conservative christian upbringing probably helps a lot, too. πŸ™‚

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