Man, I hope this class is graded on a curve…

So as you may or may not know, I am currently finishing up my BS via the University of Phoenix Online. I only have one class this term, which is “Environmental Science”. This is the first week of the course, and already I feel like an effin’ genius.

For example – today’s discussion question was as follows:

Background: In order to answer this discussion question, you should first be able to identify the processes in various biogeochemical cycles. Once you are familiar with the processes, identify the effect of human activities on those cycles.

What steps do you think can be taken to reduce the harmful effects of human activities on biogeochemical cycles? Which businesses would these changes impact the most?

So I wrote about 300-400 words talking about closed systems, ways to reduce impact to biomass, etc. A classmate of mine, however, answered the question thusly:

What steps do you think can be taken to reduce the harmful effects of human activities on biogeochemical cycles?

The people in the field of saving the earth and how to stop pollution are working have to come up with ideas to save the earth and showing people how to recycle and do things to help us all.

Which businesses would these changes impact the most?

Companies that give out pollutants will need the most help. To still make the same product, but no more polluting?? I am not sure how that will happen. I am glad I am not in that field and I am even happier that there are some pretty smart people out there that do know all about pollution and how to fix it.

From the text, “What Are Biogeochemical Cycles?
Going in Circles Global cycles recycle nutrients through the earth’s air, land, water, and living organisms and, in the process, connect past, present, and future forms of life.
All organisms are interconnected by vast global recycling systems made up of nutrient cycles, or biogeochemical cycles (literally, life–earth–chemical cycles). In these cycles, nutrient atoms, ions, and molecules that organisms need to live, grow, and reproduce are continuously cycled between air, water, soil, rock, and living organisms. These cycles, driven directly or indirectly by incoming solar energy and gravity, include the carbon, oxygen, nitrogen, phosphorus, and hydrologic (water) cycles.The earth’s chemical cycles connect past, present, and future forms of life. Some of the carbon atoms in your skin may once have been part of a leaf, a dinosaur’s skin, or a layer of limestone rock. Your grandmother, Plato, or a hunter–gatherer who lived 25,000 years ago may have inhaled some of the oxygen molecules you just inhaled.”
(pg 76)

Seriously, facepalm.

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~ by Matt Stratton on August 16, 2007.

One Response to “Man, I hope this class is graded on a curve…”

  1. *head explodes*

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